Art News Roundup: Restoration Edition

I’m both humbled and honored to formally announce that I’ll be moderating the closing Q&A and Panel Discussion at this year’s Catholic Art Guild Conference, titled “Formed In Beauty”, which is coming up at the Drake Hotel in Chicago on Sunday, November 4th. If you’re thinking about attending don’t delay too long, as tickets are now on sale but only until October 29th. This is an opportunity for all of those who care about beauty in the arts to meet with others of like mind, and thereby hopefully encourage the restoration of the beautiful not only in our churches, but by extension in our civic and domestic environments as well. If you missed Monday morning’s edition of the Son Rise Morning Show, you can catch co-host Anna Mitchell’s conversation with Catholic Art Guild President Kathleen Carr regarding this year’s Conference at about 1:51 if you follow this link.

And now, on to some other artsy stories.

A “Favourite” Film

Speaking of restoration, THE Restoration, as it’s known in the English-speaking world, which put the Stuarts back on the throne of England, ended with the reign of the rather odd and ungainly Queen Anne (1665-1714). Although it’s not out in the U.S. until Thanksgiving weekend, I currently have a film about Queen Anne on my radar, and want to put it on yours. “The Favourite” (teaser trailer here) stars Olivia Colman (probably best known to American audiences from the series “Broadchurch”), Emma Stone (Best Actress Oscar for “La La Land”), and Rachel Weisz (Best Supporting Actress Oscar for “The Constant Gardner”), so this is obviously no slouch production. I think Weisz, in particular, is worth seeing in just about everything she’s done – and yes, I include the “Mummy” films and “Constantine” in that assessment – but admittedly that’s just me.

The film explores the rise and fall of the “favourite”[British spelling], that particular friend of a monarch with whom the ruler shares their personal opinions and secrets, in a way which they cannot with their family or other courtiers. As you can imagine, the favourite occupies an enormously infleuntial position, and maintaining that position is a constant battle. In this case, Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough (Weisz) is in danger of being ousted from her position as royal BFF by her cousin, Lady Abigail Masham (Stone), when the latter arrives at court seeking a position.

Given the thematic material (there were rumors of an improper relationship between Queen Anne and Baroness Masham even at the time), this is probably going to be a film for discerning adults, rather than a history film that you can take the kiddos to. That being said, so far there is near-unanimity among serious film reviewers that all THREE actresses in the film should be nominated for Oscars this year, a feat which doesn’t happen very often. The film won the Grand Jury Prize at its premiere at the Venice Film Festival this summer, and Colman, who plays Queen Anne in the film, won Best Actress, so I expect quite a few more awards will be forthcoming. “The Favourite” opens in select U.S. cities on November 23rd.

film

Compassionate Carving

The other night I caught this documentary from NHK World, the English-language broadcaster in Japan, and wanted to share it with you since, while not about great works of art, it is very much about the restorative power of humble art created with great heart. Following the horrific loss of life in the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and subsequent tsunami, in which over 15,000 people were killed (and thousands are still reported as “missing”, even at this late date), a Buddhist priest in the northern Japanese city of Higashi-Matsushima was trying to find a way to restore inner peace for local survivors of the disaster. Many had lost some or all of their family, their homes, businesses, and everything they owned. He began to carve rustic statues of the Buddha and Buddhistic gods, and every year gives them away in an annual service at the local Buddhist temple.

The half-hour film, “Sculptures with Soul”, from NHK’s “Hometown Stories” series, is a touching and at times heartbreaking chronicle of human decency and resilience in the face of unimaginable suffering. It’s also quite a surprise coming from a culture which traditionally prides itself on its formality and reserve. Even if you know nothing about Japan or Buddhism, I want to encourage you to watch it while you can. The video is only available on the NHK website until October 6th; after that it may be elsewhere, but you’ll have to hunt about for it.

Japon

Purchasing Pugin

Sometimes, the art press comes a bit too late to the party.

As you may know, restoration and renovation of the Houses of Parliament in London is underway, and the effort will take several years to complete, given not only the vastness of the complex, but also the highly ornate Victorian decorative elements of the building. So it was exciting to learn from The Art Newspaper that one could purchase original 19th century encaustic Minton floor tiles designed by the great Augustus Pugin (1812-1852) which once covered the floors of the Palace of Westminster, as the building is properly known. Thousands of the tiles need to be replaced, given the wear and tear of nearly two centuries, and are being substituted with exact modern reproductions, as you can see here. Unfortunately, a visit to the Houses of Parliament online gift shop reveals that the tiles are all sold out. Perhaps an eagle-eyed reader will alert us, should any more of them go on sale at a later date.

raj1

Advertisements

Art News Roundup: Hopper on the Block

I don’t normally tell people what art they ought to buy or not buy, since the “what” of art collecting is really up to personal taste. That being said, it’s just been announced that the greatest painting by the American Modern-Realist painter Edward Hopper (1882-1967) left in private hands is coming up for sale at Christie’s. So if you happen to have $70 million sitting around, you should absolutely attempt to buy it.

Hopp

“Chop Suey” (1929) is classic, iconic Hopper, full of strong colors, unusual angles, and an air of mystery. You sense that we are in a moment somewhere between inaction and action, where with a single word, everything might change…or not. In fact, you’ve probably seen this image so many times, illustrating the cover of books from the Jazz Age or in retrospectives of Hopper’s work, that you probably didn’t even realize that this piece is privately owned.

This is a deceptively simple painting, until you really start to look at it. There are obvious questions such as, what are the two women talking about, or what are the young couple behind them talking about? But there are also less obvious points of enquiry, which always make trying to interpret a Hopper painting a great deal of fun.

Why, for example, does it appear as if there two light sources in the window above the man’s head, crossing over each other? Why is the fire escape ladder hanging down in front of the window at our right? Why do the couple have the little green-shaded lamp on their table, but the two women have theirs on the windowsill?

The $70 million estimate for this picture strikes me as a bit conservative: I wouldn’t be surprised, particularly in this market and given the Chinese-American thematic material, to see a Chinese collector pay $100 million for this work. The Chinese are primarily interested in brand names, when it comes to consumption, and Hopper is definitely in the upper pantheon of American artists when it comes to Modern Art.

Hopper’s current auction record is $40.5 million, for an interesting but unpopulated urban landscape painting, “East Wind over Weehawken” (1934). It depicts the slightly grim, rocky neighborhood that one drives through on the way to the Lincoln Tunnel into Manhattan from New Jersey. While Hopper’s landscapes and seascapes are nothing to sneeze it, they are more numerous than his figural paintings, which makes me think that “Chop Suey” will do better than its estimate.

And on to some other art news we go…

Beautiful Bath Tiles

The English city of Bath has welcomed visitors to its thermal springs since ancient times, when the Romans started visiting to take the waters. What visitors may not realize however, is that the current Bath Abbey, built in the late 15th-early 16th centuries, stands atop a far larger, demolished Cathedral that was built by the Normans beginning in the 11th century. Now, workers at the Abbey have uncovered some of the original Plantagenet floor tiles from that earlier building, and they are glorious things indeed.

azulejos

Blunders in Brussels

Pieter Bruegel the Elder (c.1525-1569), one of the most important and highly influential Flemish artists of the 16th century, certainly deserves a stand-alone museum, and the good people of Brussels were about to give him one. It was to be in a Renaissance house located on the same street where Bruegel lived and worked after his marriage in the parish church nearby. Unfortunately, the Bruegel House museum, which was to open next fall, is now on indefinite hold. This is not due to a lack of funds, but rather due to an overabundance of what the Belgians are particularly good at: inventing convoluted bureaucracies with draconian and utterly stupid rules.

Under current guidelines, government agencies must request approval from the federal government before spending more than $65,000, and in this case the federal government turned down the request. Work on the project has been halted indefinitely, even though the agencies involved have more than enough in reserve to pay for the project. A spokesman for the Minister of Budget, Sophie Wilmès, told the press that funding the museum was “not a desirable solution because it contradicted the budgetary objectives for federal agencies.” One is put in mind of Jim Hacker’s “British sausage” speech.

Greedo

Da Vinci Doodles

Thanks to the latest bit of gee-whiz technology, you can now get closer to looking over the shoulder of a great Old Master painter than ever before. The Victoria and Albert Museum is digitizing its collection of notebooks by Leonardo da Vinci, and has put the first two volumes online for you to virtually thumb through. The remaining two volumes will be released online in 2019 as part of the commemorations surrounding the 500th anniversary of Leonardo’s death. Not too much in the way of high art in this first release, but plenty of engineering sketches and, naturally, the master’s famous right-to-left handwriting.

Davleo

 

The World’s Greatest Swimming Pool (That Never Was)

We could probably nominate a number of structures as candidates for “World’s Greatest Swimming Pool”. For example, the “Neptune Pool”, a Greco-Roman fantasy by architect Julia Morgan at Hearst Castle in San Simeon, California comes to mind. It incorporates not only a wealth of decorative tile work, statuary, and other ornaments, but even the restored façade of an actual Roman temple which publisher William Randolph Hearst imported to the U.S. But for my money, the greatest of all swimming pools was one designed by the Catalan Surrealist Salvador Dalí – which was never built.

Back in the 1950’s, Dalí created a set of 6 tiles for a massive swimming pool, which was supposedly commissioned by a member of the regime of Spanish dictator General Francisco Franco. Called “The Catalan Suite”, the tiles bore images of different elements which the artist associated with the seaside in Catalonia, including the sun, starfish, compass roses, birds, and trencadís (the broken tiles often used by the Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí.) The bright colors would have sparkled beneath the surface of the water in the strong Mediterranean sunlight.

The most likely candidate for the commission, it seems to me, was Eugeni d’Ors, like the artist a fellow Catalan conservative and Franco supporter, who was often put in charge of overseeing artistic commissions by the Spanish government. Dalí and d’Ors had known each other for many years, since the older d’Ors was a friend of Dalí’s uncle and a fellow member of the Ateneu (“Athenaeum”), a private club for intellectuals and the well-to-do in Barcelona. They worked together on several projects, including publication of “The Cobbler of Ordis”, a collection of poems by Dalí’s lifelong friend Carles Fages de Climent, which contained a preface by d’Ors and illustrations by Dalí.

In 1954, a total of 100,000 of these Dalí-designed tiles were produced at a factory in Onda, a town in the Valencian province of Spain known for its high-quality industrial ceramic output. Yet although the materials were ready to go, the swimming pool itself, unfortunately, was never built. I suspect the reason is that d’Ors just so happened to have died in 1954, probably around the same time that the tiles were completed. As a result, Dalí was left with thousands and thousands of tiles, and nowhere to put them.

Enter German lawyer Peter Ackermann who, as this article explains, met Dalí twenty years later, when the artist was trying to get these unused tiles off his hands. About 60,000 of the tiles were left, and while it’s difficult to imagine a normal person losing 40,000 tiles, this is Salvador Dalí we’re talking about, after all. Presumably the rest disappeared as a result of breakage, theft, or the artist giving them away; they turn up at auction periodically.

Unlike his near-contemporaries Pablo Picasso and Joan Miró, Dalí did not seem particularly interested in clay as a medium, which is highly unusual for someone hailing from the Iberian Peninsula. While Picasso designed pots and vases produced by French ceramics factories which today are highly prized by collectors, and Miró created enormous ceramic tile designs for walls or floors that were installed in public spaces, Dalí did not do much exploration in this area. Yes, he designed telephones that looked like lobsters, and couches that looked like Mae West’s lips, but things made out of dirt were not something that seem to have attracted his attention all that often. That makes this particular foray into the world of ceramics all the more special.

The Artsy article tells us that Mr. Ackermann is now selling his 60,000 tiles to whoever wants to take them off his hands. Since I didn’t win the Powerball jackpot last week, I won’t be acquiring them for my make-believe villa on the Costa Brava. But if you have around $20 million on your hands, and are thinking about building yourself a nice place in which to take a dip, consider the possibilities of paving that backyard oasis with tiles by the greatest Surrealist artist of the 20th century. You’ll almost instantly have the greatest swimming pool in all the world.

Sun