Thought-Pourri: Shivering Spring Edition

In theory, I’m heading up to Newark, New Jersey on Saturday, to review the new exhibition “The Rockies & The Alps: Bierstadt, Calame, and the Romance of the Mountains”, which just opened at the Newark Museum. I say, “in theory”, because the weather forecast is still a bit iffy at the moment, calling for anywhere from a bit of sleet to up to 6 inches along the NE corridor. Being a creative sort, if I decide to err on the side of caution and stay home, I can still manage to write a piece about the show, even if I can’t get up there in person. Pity the poor cherry trees and spring bulbs here in the capital, as they are going to take a serious beating, whatever happens.

Now, on to some news.

Van Veen’s Venus

ArtNet has a great story about the discovery of a lost painting by the Dutch Old Master painter Otto Van Veen (c.1556-1629), which was found in the closet of a cultural center in Des Moines, Iowa. I’ll leave you to read the story about that picture, but use it as an excuse to explain that Van Veen is perhaps best known as being the teacher of the great Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640), although during his lifetime he was a highly successful and talented painter in his own right. One of my favorite Van Veen paintings is his portrait of the wonderfully-named Nicolaas Rockox (1560-1640), a close friend and patron of Rubens who was a lawyer, politician, courtier, art collector, and philanthropist. He spent a significant amount of his personal fortune caring for the poor during his lifetime, as well as leaving an enormous legacy after his death. This particular portrait of Rockox hangs in the Rubenshuis, Rubens’ luxurious home and art studio in downtown Antwerp, which is now a museum.

Van Veen

Fixing The Frick

The Frick Collection is possibly my favorite museum in New York, thanks to its seriously impressive art collection, a beautiful building – the former Gilded Age mansion of industrialist Henry Clay Frick – and the fact that it’s never jammed in the way that The Met usually is on a weekend. Now, after many years of fits and starts in trying to expand the public footprint of the museum, the Frick has announced that it will soon begin construction which will increase the gallery space by 30%, and open the second floor of the mansion to the general public for the first time. The designs for the expansion, by the firm of architect Annabelle Selldorf, look suitably restrained, and preserve the overall look of the Frick rather than trying to overwhelm it with add-ons: I particularly like this aspect. Additional renovations will include a 220-seat underground auditorium, conservation laboratories, and – hopefully – new facilities, since when I was there two weeks ago I was reminded of the boy’s bathroom at my Catholic grade school, which was built in 1926. Construction at the Frick is slated to begin in 2020.

Frick

Pleasures Of Portugal

Finally, regular readers are familiar with my dear friend Diana von Glahn, a filmmaker and presenter specializing in documentary series about religious pilgrimages, several of which have aired on channels such as EWTN, Catholic TV, and Salt & Light. On April 28th, should you find yourself in the Philadelphia area you’ll have the chance to meet her, as well as sample Portuguese wines, and support production of her latest work, “The Faithful Traveler in Portugal”; a trailer for the new series appears below. Diana takes us to Lisbon, Porto, and Coimbra, among many other sites in Portugal, a country with a rich religious and cultural history, and if you’ve ever seen one of her films, you know that Diana not only provides viewers with far more information than you would get on your average Travel Channel show, but she does so with warmth, humor, and enthusiasm.

“Wines & Shrines of Portugal” will take place at Holy Martyrs Catholic Church in Oreland, PA on Saturday, April 28th from 6:00-9:00 pm, and tickets cost $50 per person. Space is limited, so to reserve your seat or request additional information, you can contact Holy Martyrs at (215) 884-8575, or email them at holymartyrssecretary@gmail.com

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Thought-Pourri: Pop Song Edition

I’ll be in New York on Saturday to review the “Zurbarán’s Jacob and His Twelve Sons: Paintings from Auckland Castle” exhibition at The Frick Collection. It only occurred to me after the fact that a) I’m going to New York on St. Patrick’s Day, which does not bode well for getting about, and b) the starting route for the annual St. Patrick’s Day parade is, effectively, in front of The Frick, which also does not bode well. I plan to keep myself in a culturally appropriate good mood by downloading some pop songs by The Corrs onto my Spotify. So let’s continue with that poppy spirit in this week’s roundup of some interesting news from the art world.

I’m A Not-So-Little Teapot

For those of you who, like me, are encouraged by news of amazing finds whenever you go to a flea market or have a hunt about on Ebay, take a look at this story which has grossed one lucky collector somewhere around $800,000. It seems that this individual bought an old, cracked porcelain teapot in an online auction in England for around $20, thinking that it might be more valuable than its asking price. After consigning the piece for sale at his local auction house, it was identified by experts as a piece made by John Bartlam, a potter working in South Carolina in the mid-18th century: note the palmetto, the state tree of South Carolina, which also appears on the South Carolina state flag. The dating makes it possibly the earliest known porcelain teapot to be produced in America, and as such the piece is of tremendous historic importance, despite its somewhat shabby state of repair at present. The teapot was purchased by a London antiques dealer on behalf of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and should be heading back to these shores for the first time in over 300 years, unless the cousins refuse it an export license.

Teapot

Going To The Chapel (Not)

I encourage you to read this interesting story from Apollo Magazine, which details the history of the charming Chapel of Our Lady of Sorrows at Eton College in England, built between 1914-15 in the style of a small, Italian Baroque church. Thanks to the entrenched anti-Catholicism of the British establishment, the chapel had to be built with no windows, only skylights, and initially Catholic students at Eton were forbidden from worshiping there. The interior features many different colored marble panels, and despite the lack of windows on the sides, the light flooding in through the skylights reflects off of the surfaces and creates a jewel-like effect. This building is definitely something worth seeking out, should you find yourself thereabouts.

Eton

How Much Is That Corgi In The Painting

As regular readers know, I’m always encouraged by museum curators who try to make more of their holdings available to the public, particularly when so much art is languishing in basements and attics at public expense, but without the ability of the public to engage with it. Sometimes real treasures are found when a museum cleans out the cupboards, and such is the case with the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, which has just completed a three-year dig through its holdings. Of particular note is the charming “Portrait of Mrs. Anne Dashwood” (c. 1770) newly attributed to the great English portraitist George Romney (1734-1802), making this a find of significant value both to Romney’s catalogue raisonné and from a purely financial point of view. Corgi lovers, take note.

Romney

Thought-Pourri: Possessive Edition

For those of you in the DC area, don’t forget that tonight from 6:00-8:00 pm the Catholic Information Center, located at 1501 K Street NW, will be hosting its annual Christmas Poetry Party, in conjunction with the Thomas More Society of America. I will be one of the presenters, and if that doesn’t entirely put you off, drop by and say hello! There will be refreshments and plenty of good cheer on offer, and the event is absolutely free.

Meanwhile, this morning I’m currently participating as an absentee bidder in a live auction taking place elsewhere, for a painting that I’m very interested in adding to my collection, so fingers x’ed…

And with that, it’s time for some headlines:

The King’s Pictures

After Charles I was overthrown and executed in 1649 during the English Civil War, much of the substantial art collection which he and his ancestors had accumulated was sold off and scattered to the winds. When his son Charles II ascended the throne at the Restoration in 1660, the Stuarts had a great deal of work to do to restore the prestige of the monarchy. Through a variety of means, the new king managed to start over, acquiring a number of works of art which are featured in an exhibition this month at the Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace. Among the items featured in “Charles II: Art & Power” is one of Lorenzo Lotto’s (1480-1557) best paintings, his portrait of the Venetian art dealer Andrea Odoni sitting in his shop, surrounded by statues and casts of classical sculpture. I particularly like how the dramatically foreshortened right arm and hand are shown holding out a small classical sculpture, as if Odoni is offering it to us for sale, and the mixture of charcoal and dove grays, mossy green, and caramel browns create a surprisingly rich color palette.

Lotto

Vienna’s Virtu

The shortlived Wiener Werkstätte (“Vienna Workshop”), from the beginning of the previous century, had a major impact on Modern art, architecture, and design, thanks in part to its espousal of innovative design methods, which it disseminated globally through the creation of satellite workshops in Germany, Switzerland, and New York. Now a major new exhibition in the latter city, at the Neue Galerie for German and Austrian art, is bringing together a wide range of objects created by the Austrian artistic collective, from furniture and ceramics to jewels and decorative objects. Among the beautiful items displayed in the “Wiener Werkstätte 1903-1932: The Luxury of Beauty” show is this astonishing jewelry box, which in the art trade is known as an “objet de vertu” or “vertu” for short. These were items that often had no practical purpose, or were so luxurious as to be somewhat impractical, but which nevertheless featured an incredibly detailed and painstaking level of craftsmanship.

Wiener

Hoving’s Hordes

It’s hard to imagine now, but there was a time when art museums were fairly hushed, quiet spaces, where there were rarely large crowds of people. That all changed forever, at least at the world’s larger museums, with the blockbuster 1978 exhibition, “Treasures of Tutankhamun” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In a fascinating piece from this month’s Vulture/New York Magazine, Boris Kachka explains how one man, former Met director Thomas Hoving, took a gamble on making an art exhibition a must-see event for Americans – like the Super Bowl or the final episode of “Cheers” – and succeeded so far beyond expectations that eventually everyone else in the museum world followed suit. A healthy debate could be had over whether Hoving’s hordes of exhibition visitors have improved or ruined the experience of visiting an exhibition, or indeed a cultural institution focused primarily on visitor numbers.

Tut

Degas’ Development

Those of my readers who happen to be in the Denver area between February and May of next year will want to check out the newly-announced exhibition, “Degas: A Passion for Perfection”, which will be held at the Denver Art Museum. Covering over fifty years of the work of French Impressionist Edgar Degas (1834-1917), the show will feature over 100 examples of Degas’ varied output and artistic development, including paintings, pastels, drawings, and sculptures, alongside the work of some of his contemporaries and friends. Of particular interest is this rather early picture by Degas, painted in around 1865 and now in the collection of the Orsay in Paris, which shows a group of men on horseback shooting at and trampling over a group of nude women, while a city burns in the background. It’s such a strange picture, and so not what springs to mind when one things of the work of Degas, that I don’t quite know what to make of it – but it’s definitely piqued my interest.

Degas