Shorter Pope Francis: I’m All About That Bass

This is a wonderful opportunity for me to gain your attention through the use of an – admittedly terrible – pun, but now that I have done so, I hope the reader will indulge me and allow me to explain my choice of title a bit later in this post.

The release of the much-anticipated Papal Encyclical “Laudato Si” today did not disappoint. In it, as there should be, is plenty of material to make everyone feel uncomfortable, in the ways we live our lives and in the ways we treat one another. It also reveals both a weakness and a strength of the present Pontiff as a thinker and a writer.

While a significant portion of the document reads like a journal article assembled by a group of graduate students, the more interesting turns and jabs in the Encyclical are not what most of us expected – certainly not this scrivener, anyway. To not be able to anticipate, as one reads, how Pope Francis is going to reach some of the conclusions he does, many of which were quite surprising, makes this more readable for the average person than most papal encyclicals. What one comes away with is the impression that whatever his views on the environment, the economy, and human relationships, the Holy Father believes that the malaise we see at present comes not from a single political philosophy or economic practice, but rather from a particular attitude, one which has severely damaged Western civilization in particular: selfishness. This encyclical is perhaps the greatest indictment of the “Me” generation, and all of its policies and excesses on both the right AND the left, which we have seen to date.

While major news outlets are falling all over themselves to quote the Pope’s writing on those aspects of ecology which they themselves support, they will at the same time be ignoring those portions of the encyclical which directly attack their views. Take for example that sacred cow of the left, “reproductive health”, i.e., the right to poison oneself – and indeed everyone else’s water supply in the process – with artificial hormones and other chemicals, so that one does not have children, alongside the right to kill unwanted children if they are conceived. The Holy Father offers no quarter to those who attempt to justify such policies based on environmental arguments:

50. Instead of resolving the problems of the poor and thinking of how the world can be different, some can only propose a reduction in the birth rate. At times, developing countries face forms of international pressure which make economic assistance contingent on certain policies of “reproductive health”. Yet “while it is true that an unequal distribution of the population and of available resources creates obstacles to development and a sustainable use of the environment, it must nonetheless be recognized that demographic growth is fully compatible with an integral and shared development”. To blame population growth instead of extreme and selective consumerism on the part of some, is one way of refusing to face the issues. It is an attempt to legitimize the present model of distribution, where a minority believes that it has the right to consume in a way which can never be universalized, since the planet could not even contain the waste products of such consumption.

Similarly, for those who believe that grinding up human embryos for pharmaceutical research, or aborting children who will be born with birth defects, are moral examples of the ends justifying the means:

117. When we fail to acknowledge as part of reality the worth of a poor person, a human embryo, a person with disabilities – to offer just a few examples – it becomes difficult to hear the cry of nature itself; everything is connected. Once the human being declares independence from reality and behaves with absolute dominion, the very foundations of our life begin to crumble, for “instead of carrying out his role as a cooperator with God in the work of creation, man sets himself up in place of God and thus ends up provoking a rebellion on the part of nature”.

Also:

120. Since everything is interrelated, concern for the protection of nature is also incompatible with the justification of abortion. How can we genuinely teach the importance of concern for other vulnerable beings, however troublesome or inconvenient they may be, if we fail to protect a human embryo, even when its presence is uncomfortable and creates difficulties? “If personal and social sensitivity towards the acceptance of the new life is lost, then other forms of acceptance that are valuable for society also wither away”.

And:

136. On the other hand, it is troubling that, when some ecological movements defend the integrity of the environment, rightly demanding that certain limits be imposed on scientific research, they sometimes fail to apply those same principles to human life. There is a tendency to justify transgressing all boundaries when experimentation is carried out on living human embryos. We forget that the inalienable worth of a human being transcends his or her degree of development. In the same way, when technology disregards the great ethical principles, it ends up considering any practice whatsoever as licit. As we have seen in this chapter, a technology severed from ethics will not easily be able to limit its own power.

Admittedly I did not engage in an exact word or paragraph count, but as I was reading the Encyclical it struck me that Pope Francis – that supposedly permissive, squishy-on-morality pope – spent more time castigating moral relativism, abortion, contraception, and embryonic stem cell research, than he did addressing the issue of climate change. Oh, and Mr. Limbaugh, for your edification, should this find its way to your desk (emphasis mine):

144. A consumerist vision of human beings, encouraged by the mechanisms of today’s globalized economy, has a levelling effect on cultures, diminishing the immense variety which is the heritage of all humanity. Attempts to resolve all problems through uniform regulations or technical interventions can lead to overlooking the complexities of local problems which demand the active participation of all members of the community. New processes taking shape cannot always fit into frameworks imported from outside; they need to be based in the local culture itself. As life and the world are dynamic realities, so our care for the world must also be flexible and dynamic. Merely technical solutions run the risk of addressing symptoms and not the more serious underlying problems. There is a need to respect the rights of peoples and cultures, and to appreciate that the development of a social group presupposes an historical process which takes place within a cultural context and demands the constant and active involvement of local people from within their proper culture. Nor can the notion of the quality of life be imposed from without, for quality of life must be understood within the world of symbols and customs proper to each human group.

So now, finally, I can explain my choice of title for this piece. Much to the annoyance of those of other tongues who try to learn it, the English language has many homographs, i.e., words which when written appear to be the same, but when spoken have completely different meanings and pronunciations. Some examples are “wind”, “project”, and “lead”. Such is also the case with the word “bass”, which has several meanings: I shall focus on two.

In the natural world of course a “bass” is a type of fish. Given his strident advocacy in this Encyclical about caring for God’s creation, the Holy Father is all about that fish. He is also all about the birds, and the flowers, and the trees, and those slimy “things which creep upon the earth” from the Book of Genesis in the Bible.

However “bass” is also the word we use to describe a deep and powerful voice, most often exhibited by men. We often associate it with men of significant socio-political stature, or who are advanced in years and wisdom, or even with God Himself. One can hardly imagine the voice of God the Father, when heard at the Baptism of Christ, as being that of a tenor in sotto voce, even though we can also recall the voice of God in that “still, small voice” heard by the Prophet Elijah.

Pope Francis himself does not have a particularly powerful speaking voice, in part due to his only having one lung. And yet some of the language which he employs in this encyclical is of a rather profound, basso profoundo, take-no-prisoners quality. It comes as quite a surprise from someone who has been characterized since the beginning of his papacy as some sort of mamby-pamby, soft-spoken NPR host.

Take a look here:

67. We are not God. The earth was here before us and it has been given to us.…Each community can take from the bounty of the earth whatever it needs for subsistence, but it also has the duty to protect the earth and to ensure its fruitfulness for coming generations. “The earth is the Lord’s” (Ps 24:1); to him belongs “the earth with all that is within it” (Dt 10:14). Thus God rejects every claim to absolute ownership: “The land shall not be sold in perpetuity, for the land is mine; for you are strangers and sojourners with me” (Lev 25:23).

He’s quoting the Book of Leviticus at the end there, for those who do not know the abbreviation. LEVITICUS. Not a light-hearted romp through salvation history, that book – which should make some of us – myself included – very, very nervous.

Or this example:

75. A spirituality which forgets God as all-powerful and Creator is not acceptable. That is how we end up worshipping earthly powers, or ourselves usurping the place of God, even to the point of claiming an unlimited right to trample his creation underfoot.

Now perhaps it is just my point of view, but this does not strike me exactly as touchy-feely, wishy-washy, your-truth-and-my-truth stuff. In fact it is almost an echo of the preceding quote: God is God, and you most emphatically are not. Start acting like it.

For me though, the best example of how Pope Francis really is all about that bass appears in Paragraph 229. I would not have expected such a statement from such a pope, particularly given how he has been portrayed by the media on both sides of the political aisle since his election. In its directness and lack of sophistication, it is not going to convince any of the Holy Father’s more intellectual naysayers. In its rejection of the kind of solipsism which has become the sine qua non of Western culture, and indeed in its outright chastisement of what has happened to that culture, it is the kind of statement which one sometimes wishes one’s bishops would have the courage to say, and yet so often we are left having to say it for ourselves, as lay people:

229. We must regain the conviction that we need one another, that we have a shared responsibility for others and the world, and that being good and decent are worth it. We have had enough of immorality and the mockery of ethics, goodness, faith and honesty. It is time to acknowledge that light-hearted superficiality has done us no good. When the foundations of social life are corroded, what ensues are battles over conflicting interests, new forms of violence and brutality, and obstacles to the growth of a genuine culture of care for the environment.

Someone observed on my Facebook wall this morning that J.R.R. Tolkien, the deeply Catholic author of “The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings”, would have loved this Encyclical. I would add, so would Pope St. John Paul II, Blessed Mother Theresa of Calcutta, and many others, who devoted their lives to advocating compassionate care for the world they were born into, and the people who live in it. Like them, Pope Francis is right to draw attention especially to the oppressed and the unwanted.

Now I must confess, gentle reader: I am still not a fan of this Pope. I find him tacky, unfocused, overly pedestrian, and lacking in grace. Yet this encyclical is quite a worthy shot across the bow of the moral relativism we ALL espouse to justify our selfishness. You cannot make short-term profits on the backs of the poor, any more than you can save the whales while killing the babies, and thereafter morally justify your actions in the eyes of God. As quoted above, when our society is so corrupted and falling apart that everything is relative – the profit motive, sexual morality, and yes, creation itself – then we have a very serious problem as a species. If this Encyclical made you uncomfortable, as it did me, then good: now go off and do something about that.

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Is Gaudí Getting Closer to Sainthood?

Regular readers know of my admiration for the great Catalan architect, Antoni Gaudí i Cornet (1852-1926), most famous for his Basilica of the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona.  The hugely original and innovative Gaudí was a deeply devout man, and spent the last decades of his life working exclusively on this structure which, when it is completed around 2026, will be the tallest church in the world.  With a new Vatican-approved graduate studies program being named after him, and Gaudí’s cause for beatification now in the review stage in Rome, one wonders whether this is a sign that the Vatican is moving in the direction of his canonization.

Located in Barcelona, the Antoni Gaudí School offers graduate studies in Church history, Christian art, and now archaeological studies, in conjunction with programs approved by the Vatican.  The architect himself loved archaeology, not only as part of his research and design process, but also as a reason to go out into the countryside at the weekends with fellow enthusiasts.  Groups of these thinkers and creative individuals would explore ancient ruins and crumbling castles to get a better sense of their own history, as well as to understand design concepts and building methods.

Pope Benedict XVI admired the Catalan architect a great deal.  He not only traveled to Barcelona to dedicate the church and raise it to the level of a Minor Basilica, but he also used a photograph of the sculpture of the Holy Family on the Nativity Facade of the building for his official Christmas cards that year.  An exhibition celebrating Gaudí’s work was mounted at the Vatican at the same time. And recently, Pope Francis accepted a gift of a portrait bust of Gaudí from the group promoting his cause for beatification, a work based on an original carved shortly after the architect’s death.

The current expectation is that the Congregation for the Causes of Saints will complete their investigation sometime in the spring of 2015, and will make their recommendations to the Holy Father at that time. Despite some earlier rumors that beatification was going to be announced for certain, so far there has been no official word from the Congregation on that point. It would seem to me more likely that he would first be made a “Venerable”, if the cause is moving forward, but Catalan sources insist that Rome will be skipping straight to beatification.  To my knowledge, Pope Francis has never spoken about Gaudí publicly in the way that Pope Benedict has, so we can’t assume anything one way or the other with respect to his urging the work of the Congregation forward.

That being said, the fact that the Vatican seems to be encouraging naming things after “God’s Architect”, as he is often called, seems to me to be a good sign.

Work underway on the central towers of the Sagrada Familia, Barcelona

Work underway on the central towers of the Sagrada Familia, Barcelona

The Full-Time Job of Being a Catholic

We had one of those rare moments on social media yesterday, when Catholics and non-Catholics alike came together to collectively roll our eyes at the mainstream media’s continuing efforts to deliberately misrepresent Catholicism.  In case you missed it, the touchstone was an address by Pope Francis in which His Holiness touched upon issues of science.  The breathless response of most secular media outlets was to proclaim that the Holy Father was once again challenging the establishment, changing Church doctrine, and so forth.

Except, of course, that he wasn’t doing any such thing.

I’m not going to attempt to write a blog post about the Church’s teachings on the Book of Genesis, the origin of human beings, and so on; that has already been done, by far better writers than I; you can find all kinds of information on Catholic Answers, for example.  Nor am I intending to take this brief amount of space to provide a lengthy rebuttal to the notion that the Church is somehow anti-science.  There are in fact plenty of others who are doing just that, such as my friend Ian Maxfield in Scotland, who has spent years chronicling the contributions of the Church and Catholics to all areas of science, many of which remain completely unfamiliar to most.

Instead, this is an opportunity to address something else, which I suspect many have been asking themselves over the past several years, not just under this Pope but indeed under the two previous popes as well.  Why, one may reasonably ask, are we always having to explain what the Catholic Church does and does not believe?  The answer is, I’m afraid, that it’s our full-time job. Allow me to explain.

Last evening I was watching a PBS travel show in which the host, whose anti-Catholic bent is often thinly-veiled, used the word “worship” when describing Catholics pausing to pray before a statue of the Virgin Mary at a chapel in Croatia.  As Catholics know, and indeed non-Catholics should know, we don’t worship Mary AT ALL (let alone statues.) Period.  Worship is for God alone; Mary is a creature rather than a creator, a human being and not a goddess.  To use the word “worship” in this context is either to spread anti-Catholic misinformation, or a demonstration of spectacular ignorance about one of the core beliefs of the Church, which those who are unfamiliar with Catholicism will simply accept as true, because it happens to have been broadcast on television.

Notice that I just managed to tell you, my readers, what the truth is, and it did not require a special Vatican commission to be appointed in order for me to do so.  Because you see with all the fuss and fumbling over the Church – what did the Pope say or what did that bishop remark – one thing that Catholics often forget is that the Church hierarchy is there to shepherd us, but not to fight all our battles.  We are like sheep, but we are not actual sheep; even sheep know that for the most part, they need to stick together.  Otherwise, the wolves will have a field day.

All Catholics are called upon to evangelize, not just the ones wearing robes and funny hats.  The Vatican isn’t going to come running to the rescue every time someone says something about Catholicism that is untrue. It may be somewhat inside baseball to remark that the press office there could be a bit more organized and consistent, but that being said, only God is omnipresent, not Father Lombardi.

Christ expects that the job of each one of us is to live out the Christian life where we are in life, whatever our station.  I may not be able to get on NBC and denounce their bad reporting, but I can sure raise a stink about it among my friends on social media, or indeed on this blog. And you can do the same, gentle reader.

These continuing opportunities to re-discover what Catholics believe, and to share that belief with those who might otherwise never hear it, is something that all of us must do, even if we’re just having a chat with the neighbors over the back fence.  The final command of Jesus before His Ascension, that His followers go do the  job of teaching all nations, should start right where we are, now.  We need to realize that it is our job to do so, whether in responding directly to a large media organization, or right in our literal back yard.

Detail of "St. Peter Preaching" by Fra Angelico (c. 1433) Museo di San Marco, Florence

Detail of “St. Peter Preaching” by Fra Angelico (c. 1433)
Museo di San Marco, Florence