The (Wearable) Gospel Of John

​I have a bit of shameless electronic nepotism for you today, gentle reader, which I hope you will choose to participate in.

If you watch “The Journey Home” on EWTN, you may have seen the recent episode featuring new media producer Seth Paine, or that featuring his wife, artist Michelle Paine. I first met Seth at the Catholic New Media Conference in Atlanta last year, and at first I was quite astounded by his very High Victorian mustache. I later came to appreciate his good humor in singing karaoke in what turned out to be a rather sketchy part of town, with some rather loud people whom he had never met before. (Well okay, the Barrons, Jennifer Willits, and I were rather loud – others were quieter.

As I’ve come to know Seth better, his humor, his love for his family (and for music), his creativity, and his faith have all impressed me a great deal. Seth understands, and is very good at, using new media as a tool for evangelization. So it’s not surprising that his site is called nuCatholic Media.

Unlike in secular media, I can tell you from first-hand experience that there is often very little in the way of financial support out there for creative Catholics in new media who come up with faith-based outreach projects. That being the case, it’s important to help out content producers like Seth with their efforts. To that end, I’m going to quote him here regarding a t-shirt campaign that he’s come up with, where he shares his inspiration from St. John’s Gospel in a wearable way:  

For his master’s thesis, Seth created the beginning of an interactive documentary called Food for the Journey which is focused on the beauty of the sacraments and their role in the Christian life.  As you know, film equipment isn’t cheap, and Seth’s working to not only finish the Food for the Journey project but also do more video shorts with the kind of production quality that reflects his love of the subject matter.

To raise money and do something creative at the same time, he’s designed the shirts you see featured on this page.  The theme of the design is the Gospel of John, with a word cloud of the terms that most commonly occur in that book of the Bible arranged in the shape of the Sacred Heart of Jesus.  So when someone looks at your shirt and wonders why some words are bigger than others, that’s your handy explanation.  We think it looks pretty cool and makes for an awesome conversation starter.

The shirt is available for a limited time only, so be sure to grab one now!  John’s Gospel serves as the inspiration for Seth’s Food for the Journey project, as well as some of the other projects he’s planning to tackle if this campaign goes well.  We’d love your support, and your help getting the message of Christ’s love to a world flooded with counterfeit versions of love- please share this page with anyone you know who might be interested in either this shirt or Seth’s projects!

If you’re interested, head on over to the Gospel of John page on Teespring, where the limited edition Gospel of John shirt is available until October 13th. The shirt comes in several styles and colors, for both men and women. There are also a mug and tote bag featuring the same design, and as Christmas approaches, these would make unique gifts that you can’t just order on Amazon or pick up at Walmart.

Thanks in advance for your support, gentle reader, and please be sure to share this with anyone whom you think may be willing to lend a hand!

Dangerous Instruments: Your Online Life And Your Creative Legacy

I get email inquiries all the time from visitors to my side project, CatholicBarcelona.com, which is an online guide in English to all of the historic churches, monasteries, etc. in Barcelona. People want to know which sites are closest to their hotel, or if I can recommend a particular Sunday Mass, or where they can get married. A common question involves requests for Masses in other languages.

Some months ago I received an email from a lady whom I will call “T”. T had recently moved from her country to suburban Barcelona, but she had started to look into becoming a Catholic before she had left her home country. She wanted some suggestions on joining a parish, and also whether I knew of anywhere that she could receive instruction on Catholicism, through the program commonly known as RCIA, the Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults. I gave her a couple of recommendations and wished her luck, assuming I would never hear from her again.

Then yesterday morning, I received an email from T, some four months after I last heard from her. She told me that not only had she joined the parish I suggested would probably work for her, but one of the priests there was giving her private RCIA instruction. She is thrilled and hopes to come into the Church next Easter.

Now at the end of the day, what is happening in T’s life is the working of the Holy Spirit, not me. If she hadn’t found the information she was seeking through me, she would have found it somewhere else. However I wanted to share this story with you for an important reason.

There’s no question that the connections we make via online media can be toxic. All you have to do is read the comments section on just about any blog to realize that there are a lot of bitter, unhappy people out there, who not only espouse crazy theories, they are more than happy to share them with you. Twitter and Facebook, at times, can seem little more than a flame war, while even the most seemingly innocuous Instagram account can take on a different tinge, when you look not at the images being posted by that user you’re following, but at the images that they are “liking”.

I‘ll be the first to raise my hand and declare that I’m as big and bad a sinner online, as I am in real life: the Seven Deadly Sins and I have been shacked up for quite a long time. It’s easy to think, when we look at someone’s online presence, “Wow, what a hypocrite/whackjob/jerk!” Except that if we turn the mirror around, I expect most of us will find ourselves doing the same things.   

Online media is not intrinsically evil, it is merely a tool: a means, not an end. It can be a tool of darkness, absolutely, for it can create all kinds of evil things. Yet it can also be a tool for good. We all, myself included, need to take a step back from time to time and ask what sort of online instruments we are.

Certainly we are all rusty, dangerous instruments when we chose to do evil. The fellow downstairs is more than happy to use us to injure others, if we let him. In the process, we end up injuring ourselves, becoming weaker and duller until we eventually snap and get tossed in the garbage.

Yet if we put ourselves in God’s hands, even in our sorry and decrepit state, by choosing to work the way that He wants us to, we can be as beneficial and healing in our online relationships as a well-wielded scalpel in the hands of a gifted surgeon. That is where, as the saying goes, the struggle is real. And it is a struggle all of us, myself included, need to be reminded of, when we are doing anything online.

Whether you are writing a blog post or tweet, sending a direct message or chat, or uploading an image or document, in creating online content you are creating a body of work that speaks not only to who you are as a content creator, but also about whom you are taking as your creative advisor. You can be an instrument for creating good, or you can be an instrument for destructive evil. Don’t let that choice go by, unexamined, in your online activities.

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"Against The Common Good" by Francisco de Goya (c. 1814-15)

The Faithful Traveler – On Your Radio!

I’m extremely pleased to share with you that my dear friend Diana von Glahn – aka The Faithful Traveler – now has her own daily radio show! You can hear Diana on Monday thru Friday at 11am on RealLife Radio, streaming online wherever you happen to be. You can also listen on-air if you’re in the Lexington, Kentucky area on 94.9 FM and 1380 AM. Missed a show? You can catch the podcast version on Diana’s site, via iTunes, or the RealLife Radio site. And on the RLR site, you can learn about their other programming from people whom you may already know from the writing world, like Elizabeth Scalia and Allison Gingras.

If you’ve seen her on television or DVD’s, or heard her on other radio shows and podcasts, you know that Diana has a knack for this sort of thing. She is bubbly and a lot of fun, but can also quickly get to the heart of a serious matter being discussed. (It’s all that piercing legal analysis Diana and I learned at the knee of the late, great Dr. Charlie Rice at Notre Dame Law School.) And each week, in addition to special guests, Diana will have some great regulars: her husband and Faithful Traveler co-creator David von Glahn; Denise Bossert; Jeff Young, aka The Catholic Foodie; Amy Wellborn; and Jerome Robbins, many of whom may already be familiar to you.

If you like what you hear, be sure to consider two things. First, make a donation, since things like bandwidth and hosting do not come free, even if the download does! Second, go leave a positive review on iTunes or through Diana or RealLife Radio’s sites, so that they know you’re listening and enjoying the program. As content producers, we all live and die by feedback, so even if you just want to say “Great job!”, your comments are unbelievably welcome. Thanks!

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