The Courtier – En Español

Today being Spain’s National Day, it seems appropriate to share with my readers the first translation of a published piece of mine into Spanish.

I was pleasantly surprised to discover that my recent post on the Infant Jesus of Prague, written for Aleteia’s English language portal, had been translated and posted on Aleteia’s Spanish language portal. Fortunately the translation was not mine, since it would have taken me ages to churn it out. Despite being fluent in conversational Spanish, and being able to read a newspaper or engage in social media in Spanish with little difficulty, I don’t have the depth of grammar necessary to be able to write something the length of a blog post in that language.

The original image of the Infant of Prague hails from Spain, of course, and its origins are often associated with St. Teresa of Ávila and the Carmelite Order. This devotion is widespread throughout the Spain and its former colonies in Latin America, Africa, and the Philippines, but has touched other communities as well. In the comments left on both the English and Spanish versions of the post, it was touching to read personal stories of what He has meant to different people around the world.

While I can’t say that this is the first of many pieces in Spanish that you will see with my name on it, I’m very grateful to Aleteia for thinking it worth translating to reach an even wider audience.

The Courtier In Aleteia: On The Infant Jesus Of Prague

My latest piece for Aleteia is a reflection on the Infant Jesus of Prague, the famous devotional object from Spain that ended up in Bohemia during the Renaissance. I had never been particularly interested in this representation of the Christ Child until several years ago, when I turned to Him at a very difficult moment in my life. As always, my thanks to Elizabeth Scalia and her staff at Aleteia for publishing my scribblings.

Meeting At Bethany

The attentive reader will look at the calendar and realize that this coming Sunday is Palm Sunday, the beginning of Holy Week. In Spain – and possibly in other places as well – today, the Friday shortly before Palm Sunday, has its own spiritual tradition, based partly on Scripture and partly on tradition. Whether or not one accepts the theory, I think you’ll find it an interesting point of reflection.

We know from the Gospels that prior to entering Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, Jesus was staying with his close friends Martha, Mary, and Lazarus in Bethany. Indeed, St. John’s Gospel places the raising of Lazarus from the dead before Palm Sunday. In Spain, it is commonly believed that on the Friday before Palm Sunday, Jesus’ Mother Mary was in Bethany as well. Moreover, pious belief is that He told her, on that Friday, what was going to happen to Him the following Friday.

There is a certain logic to this belief. Surely if the Virgin Mary had heard about the death of Lazarus, it would have been reasonable for her, as a Jewish matron, to go comfort Lazarus’ sisters. Her presence in Bethany at the time, and staying there to celebrate Passover rather than returning to Nazareth, would also explain why, within hours of Jesus’ arrest, she is present in Jerusalem to witness His execution. After all, Nazareth is about 90 miles from Jerusalem, whereas Bethany is only about a mile and a half away.

Even if Jesus did not get to see His Mother prior to entering into His Passion, she was of course there to witness His sacrifice on Calvary. Yet I rather fancy that He did see her. Perhaps they talked late into the night that Friday, or perhaps she simply accepted what He told her, much as she accepted the message of the Angel Gabriel at the Annunciation, which we commemorated this week. She may not have been able to understand how God would bring about what she was told would happen, but once again she did not shy away. She believed, and put herself at His service.

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Detail, "Virgin of Sorrows" by Murillo