Art News Roundup: Restoration Edition

I’m both humbled and honored to formally announce that I’ll be moderating the closing Q&A and Panel Discussion at this year’s Catholic Art Guild Conference, titled “Formed In Beauty”, which is coming up at the Drake Hotel in Chicago on Sunday, November 4th. If you’re thinking about attending don’t delay too long, as tickets are now on sale but only until October 29th. This is an opportunity for all of those who care about beauty in the arts to meet with others of like mind, and thereby hopefully encourage the restoration of the beautiful not only in our churches, but by extension in our civic and domestic environments as well. If you missed Monday morning’s edition of the Son Rise Morning Show, you can catch co-host Anna Mitchell’s conversation with Catholic Art Guild President Kathleen Carr regarding this year’s Conference at about 1:51 if you follow this link.

And now, on to some other artsy stories.

A “Favourite” Film

Speaking of restoration, THE Restoration, as it’s known in the English-speaking world, which put the Stuarts back on the throne of England, ended with the reign of the rather odd and ungainly Queen Anne (1665-1714). Although it’s not out in the U.S. until Thanksgiving weekend, I currently have a film about Queen Anne on my radar, and want to put it on yours. “The Favourite” (teaser trailer here) stars Olivia Colman (probably best known to American audiences from the series “Broadchurch”), Emma Stone (Best Actress Oscar for “La La Land”), and Rachel Weisz (Best Supporting Actress Oscar for “The Constant Gardner”), so this is obviously no slouch production. I think Weisz, in particular, is worth seeing in just about everything she’s done – and yes, I include the “Mummy” films and “Constantine” in that assessment – but admittedly that’s just me.

The film explores the rise and fall of the “favourite”[British spelling], that particular friend of a monarch with whom the ruler shares their personal opinions and secrets, in a way which they cannot with their family or other courtiers. As you can imagine, the favourite occupies an enormously infleuntial position, and maintaining that position is a constant battle. In this case, Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough (Weisz) is in danger of being ousted from her position as royal BFF by her cousin, Lady Abigail Masham (Stone), when the latter arrives at court seeking a position.

Given the thematic material (there were rumors of an improper relationship between Queen Anne and Baroness Masham even at the time), this is probably going to be a film for discerning adults, rather than a history film that you can take the kiddos to. That being said, so far there is near-unanimity among serious film reviewers that all THREE actresses in the film should be nominated for Oscars this year, a feat which doesn’t happen very often. The film won the Grand Jury Prize at its premiere at the Venice Film Festival this summer, and Colman, who plays Queen Anne in the film, won Best Actress, so I expect quite a few more awards will be forthcoming. “The Favourite” opens in select U.S. cities on November 23rd.

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Compassionate Carving

The other night I caught this documentary from NHK World, the English-language broadcaster in Japan, and wanted to share it with you since, while not about great works of art, it is very much about the restorative power of humble art created with great heart. Following the horrific loss of life in the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and subsequent tsunami, in which over 15,000 people were killed (and thousands are still reported as “missing”, even at this late date), a Buddhist priest in the northern Japanese city of Higashi-Matsushima was trying to find a way to restore inner peace for local survivors of the disaster. Many had lost some or all of their family, their homes, businesses, and everything they owned. He began to carve rustic statues of the Buddha and Buddhistic gods, and every year gives them away in an annual service at the local Buddhist temple.

The half-hour film, “Sculptures with Soul”, from NHK’s “Hometown Stories” series, is a touching and at times heartbreaking chronicle of human decency and resilience in the face of unimaginable suffering. It’s also quite a surprise coming from a culture which traditionally prides itself on its formality and reserve. Even if you know nothing about Japan or Buddhism, I want to encourage you to watch it while you can. The video is only available on the NHK website until October 6th; after that it may be elsewhere, but you’ll have to hunt about for it.

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Purchasing Pugin

Sometimes, the art press comes a bit too late to the party.

As you may know, restoration and renovation of the Houses of Parliament in London is underway, and the effort will take several years to complete, given not only the vastness of the complex, but also the highly ornate Victorian decorative elements of the building. So it was exciting to learn from The Art Newspaper that one could purchase original 19th century encaustic Minton floor tiles designed by the great Augustus Pugin (1812-1852) which once covered the floors of the Palace of Westminster, as the building is properly known. Thousands of the tiles need to be replaced, given the wear and tear of nearly two centuries, and are being substituted with exact modern reproductions, as you can see here. Unfortunately, a visit to the Houses of Parliament online gift shop reveals that the tiles are all sold out. Perhaps an eagle-eyed reader will alert us, should any more of them go on sale at a later date.

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Thought-Pourri: Shivering Spring Edition

In theory, I’m heading up to Newark, New Jersey on Saturday, to review the new exhibition “The Rockies & The Alps: Bierstadt, Calame, and the Romance of the Mountains”, which just opened at the Newark Museum. I say, “in theory”, because the weather forecast is still a bit iffy at the moment, calling for anywhere from a bit of sleet to up to 6 inches along the NE corridor. Being a creative sort, if I decide to err on the side of caution and stay home, I can still manage to write a piece about the show, even if I can’t get up there in person. Pity the poor cherry trees and spring bulbs here in the capital, as they are going to take a serious beating, whatever happens.

Now, on to some news.

Van Veen’s Venus

ArtNet has a great story about the discovery of a lost painting by the Dutch Old Master painter Otto Van Veen (c.1556-1629), which was found in the closet of a cultural center in Des Moines, Iowa. I’ll leave you to read the story about that picture, but use it as an excuse to explain that Van Veen is perhaps best known as being the teacher of the great Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640), although during his lifetime he was a highly successful and talented painter in his own right. One of my favorite Van Veen paintings is his portrait of the wonderfully-named Nicolaas Rockox (1560-1640), a close friend and patron of Rubens who was a lawyer, politician, courtier, art collector, and philanthropist. He spent a significant amount of his personal fortune caring for the poor during his lifetime, as well as leaving an enormous legacy after his death. This particular portrait of Rockox hangs in the Rubenshuis, Rubens’ luxurious home and art studio in downtown Antwerp, which is now a museum.

Van Veen

Fixing The Frick

The Frick Collection is possibly my favorite museum in New York, thanks to its seriously impressive art collection, a beautiful building – the former Gilded Age mansion of industrialist Henry Clay Frick – and the fact that it’s never jammed in the way that The Met usually is on a weekend. Now, after many years of fits and starts in trying to expand the public footprint of the museum, the Frick has announced that it will soon begin construction which will increase the gallery space by 30%, and open the second floor of the mansion to the general public for the first time. The designs for the expansion, by the firm of architect Annabelle Selldorf, look suitably restrained, and preserve the overall look of the Frick rather than trying to overwhelm it with add-ons: I particularly like this aspect. Additional renovations will include a 220-seat underground auditorium, conservation laboratories, and – hopefully – new facilities, since when I was there two weeks ago I was reminded of the boy’s bathroom at my Catholic grade school, which was built in 1926. Construction at the Frick is slated to begin in 2020.

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Pleasures Of Portugal

Finally, regular readers are familiar with my dear friend Diana von Glahn, a filmmaker and presenter specializing in documentary series about religious pilgrimages, several of which have aired on channels such as EWTN, Catholic TV, and Salt & Light. On April 28th, should you find yourself in the Philadelphia area you’ll have the chance to meet her, as well as sample Portuguese wines, and support production of her latest work, “The Faithful Traveler in Portugal”; a trailer for the new series appears below. Diana takes us to Lisbon, Porto, and Coimbra, among many other sites in Portugal, a country with a rich religious and cultural history, and if you’ve ever seen one of her films, you know that Diana not only provides viewers with far more information than you would get on your average Travel Channel show, but she does so with warmth, humor, and enthusiasm.

“Wines & Shrines of Portugal” will take place at Holy Martyrs Catholic Church in Oreland, PA on Saturday, April 28th from 6:00-9:00 pm, and tickets cost $50 per person. Space is limited, so to reserve your seat or request additional information, you can contact Holy Martyrs at (215) 884-8575, or email them at holymartyrssecretary@gmail.com

Thought-Pourri: Genius Edition

I’ve been very pleased over the last 24 hours to receive several comments from readers of my most recent piece for The Federalist, published yesterday, about the current Frick exhibition of Francisco de Zurbarán’s “Jacob and His Twelve Sons”, along the lines of, “I’ve never heard of Zurbarán before!” While he is one of the most famous old Masters in Spain and Latin America, and had a huge influence on a number of Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, and Modern artists, he is unfortunately not as well-known in the States as he ought to be. So I’m glad to have had the chance, albeit in a very small way, to introduce this great genius to a new audience. If you are in New York at all between now and April 22nd, you really want to see this show.

And this being Holy Thursday, it’s perfect to lead off today’s art news roundup with an exciting new art history documentary about one of the most famous pieces of sacred art in the world, created by one of the greatest geniuses in human history.

A Second “Last Supper”?

“The Last Supper”, arguably the best-known religious work ever painted by Leonardo da Vinci – and certainly the most iconic image of this subject in all of art history – is, as you probably know, something of a wreck. It was painted in 1499 for the Dominicans on the refectory wall of their convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan, and from the beginning the work has captured the imagination of all who have seen it. In fact, I suspect that when you read the words, “The Last Supper”, most likely Leonardo’s painting immediately popped into your head. Unfortunately, thanks to the highly experimental techniques used by Leonardo, as well as the ravages of time, today the fresco is only a shadow of its former self.

Now, as Art News reports at length, researchers have stumbled across a major discovery which allows us (as nearly as possible) to see “The Last Supper” as Leonardo originally intended.

It turns out that after Louis XII of France conquered the Duchy of Milan in 1507, at which time Leonardo came into his service, he ordered a full-scale copy of the fresco on canvas, which was made using the original cartoons (detailed transfer drawings) that the artist had used in outlining his design on the wall of the convent dining room. Miraculously, the experts working on this book and film project were eventually able to track down the king’s copy, which has been hanging unnoticed in an abbey in Belgium for the last 5 centuries. Not only does the copy match up perfectly with the original, showing us details which have now vanished due to the deterioration of the fresco, but experts believe that while most of the painting was executed by one of Leonardo’s chief assistants, the figures of Christ and St. John were probably painted by Leonardo himself.

“The Search for the Last Supper” will begin airing on local PBS stations this weekend; as the saying goes, check your local listings.

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“Mona Lisa” Staying Put

Speaking of Leonardo, you may recall my telling you about a hare-brained scheme by France’s culture minister, Françoise Nyssen, to send the “Mona Lisa” out on tour to combat what she calls “cultural segregation” (whatever that means.) The Louvre has now politely responded and said, in so many words, “You can forget that idea.” During a recent meeting with Mme. Nyssen, Louvre Director Jean-Luc Martinez explained that the painting cannot be sent on tour, because “doing so could cause irreversible damage.” The painting is in extremely delicate condition, and in particular suffers from a crack which opens up every time it is removed from its current spot in the museum. Unfortunately, politicians have rarely batted an eyelid when it comes to destroying great masterpieces of painting, sculpture, or architecture for the sake of populist politics, whether of the left or the right. So perhaps the best bit in The Art Newspaper’s reporting on this story which certainly made *me* smile, is the following:

The culture ministry at first claimed that the Louvre “was not opposed to the idea”. It now says that the idea “is still under consideration” and that “a technical examination has started” (museum staff have no knowledge of this). Suggesting that other masterpieces could tour France, Nyssen is clearly looking for a way out of a publicity stunt gone wrong.

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Celebrating the Genius of Tolkien

A major exhibition celebrating the life and work of “The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings” author JRR Tolkien will be opening on June 1st at Oxford; from its description, this will no doubt become one of the major UK museum shows taking place outside of London this summer. As the Bodelian explains:

Visitors will also be introduced to the vast spectrum of Tolkien’s creative and scholarly output ranging from his early abstract paintings in The Book of Ishness to the metrical brilliance of his poem Errantry and the touching tales he wrote for his children. The spectacular range of objects on display will include original manuscripts of his popular classics as well as lesser-known and posthumous works and materials, some of which will be on public display for the very first time.

This will all be in addition to his watercolors and annotated drawings for “The Hobbit” and other books, as well as personal objects, letters, photographs, and so on. I probably won’t be making it to England this summer, but I can tell you right now that I will absolutely be ordering a copy of the exhibition catalogue. “Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth” will be at the Weston Library of the University of Oxford until October 28th.

Hobbit