Two DC Christmas Events To Calendar

As subscribers know I normally only post twice a week, but for those of you in the DC area I wanted to share two upcoming events that may be of interest. There are always many Christmas-related events here in the capital, and if you don’t put them on your calendar ahead of time, you tend to forget until the day of – or worse, until after they’ve already past. So here goes:

CHRISTMAS POETRY PARTY
Thursday, December 14th @ 6:00 pm
Catholic Information Center
1501 K Street, NW
Metro: McPherson Square
Admission: Free, but please RSVP

This annual gathering is co-hosted by the Thomas More Society of America and the Catholic Information Center, and features seasonal treats as well as Christmas-related poetry (and the odd bit of prose) readings by members and supporters of the Society and the CIC. The event always draws a lively crowd, and I’m honored to have been asked to give recitations for the past several years in a row. Prior attendees have now come to expect that my particular reading will be…a bit different from the others. Please drop in and if you spot me, come over and say hello!

CHRISTMAS CONCERT AND CD RELEASE
Tuesday, December 19th @ 7:30 pm
St. Stephen Martyr Catholic Church
Metro: Foggy Bottom
Admission: Free (donations suggested; CD’s available for purchase)

Those of you who follow me on social media know how often I mention what a magnificent job the music ministry does at my parish of St. Stephen’s in Foggy Bottom; you may have even listened to some of my (not-so-great-quality) recordings of them at work, such as this one. Now you have the chance to hear our superb organist/music director Neil Weston – shown here playing the church’s organ – and the members of the choir in action, as they perform Christmas carols and celebrate the release of their latest album, commemorating the 150th anniversary of the founding of St. Stephen’s. Every single person whom I have ever brought to St. Stephen’s has remarked on how glorious the music is, even better than those at other, not-to-be-named Catholic houses of worship in this city of greater size but lesser acoustics. I can guarantee that you will not be disappointed if you decide to honor us with your attendance.

 

Three Quick Reminders

1. Today is the Solemnity of St. Joseph, Spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Foster-Father of Jesus. Because it’s a Solemnity, if this was a Friday, my fellow Catholics would be allowed to eat meat. Moreover, if you gave up something for Lent, such as candy, then you’re allowed to have it today, because Solemnities – like Sundays – are not considered to be part of Lent. (We get another one next Wednesday, the Solemnity of the Annunciation.) Of course, most people are probably going to stick to their “give-ups” but there you are.

If I was in Barcelona, today would be a day for eating “canelons de festa” or “feast day cannelloni”.  However, since Catalan-style cannelloni has not really made it big over here yet, and I don’t have the inclination to make canelons myself, I’ll have to come up with something else. Knowing that it’s more likely for the majority of my readers to understand Spanish rather than Catalan, here’s a video in Spanish giving you a quick overview of how to make this superb pasta dish.

2. Today is also your chance to pop along to the Catholic Information Center, should you happen to find yourself in the Nation’s Capital, and hear Randy Boyagoda discussing his new book, “Richard John Neuhaus – A Life in the Public Square”, about the great conservative thinker, writer, and founder of “First Things”. The CIC is located on K Street between 15th and 16th, close to the White House as well as McPherson and Farragut Squares, so very easy to get to. Hope to see many of my DC readers there as, Catholic or not, Father Neuhaus was a hugely important influence on the public life of this country – among those who read and think about things, anyway – for many years.

3. As you make your weekend plans, don’t forget that Saturday night Passiontide with the Dominican Friars will take place at St. Dominic’s Church, located close to the L’Enfant Plaza Metro. I assure you that the magnificence of said church more than makes up for the horror that is starchitect I.M. Pei’s senseless destruction of the neighborhood around it. The evening should be absolutely beautiful, as will the Spring weather – mostly sunny and 63 degrees for the high on Saturday – so no excuses for sitting at home.

Canelons

“Something Other Than God”: Jennifer Fulwiler at the CIC

In a dynamic, engaging presentation last night, blogger, author, and radio host Jennifer Fulwiler gave a powerful presentation on her journey from atheism to Christianity.  While using the framework of her book, Something Other Than God, which chronicles her conversion, Ms. Fulwiler also managed to touch on a wide range of subjects, from the cultural differences between the Texas Bible Belt and the East Coast, to raising children in a culture which is increasingly hostile to Christianity.  Along the way, the attendees at the Catholic Information Center here in DC were given much to laugh about, and much to think about, over the course of the evening.

It’s hard for me to imagine the kind of atheism that Ms. Fulwiler grew up with.  She noted that when she was little, her father used to read books by Carl Sagan to her, alongside the more typical Nancy Drew stories, and she recalled being a 4th grader and hiding all of the Bibles in a bookstore in the “Fiction” section.  Her atheism was so intrinsically a part of who she was, that as an undergraduate she transferred from Texas A&M to the University of Texas at Austin, because she couldn’t stand the highly Christian environment of the former.

Ms. Fulwiler took the time to speak about the “new” atheism, without lingering upon it too much, since this was her story rather than theirs.  She did however make a very salient point, which is that even though a lot of the new atheism is based upon a shallow understanding or even misunderstanding of the teachings of Christianity, Dawkins, et al., had done one thing well: they were great at marketing and branding.  For young people in particular, being a new atheist can be a way of signaling to others that, “I’m smart,” and wanting to fit in with a group of one’s peers.

I could relate to her childhood fascination with the study of fossils, and her desire to be a paleontologist, something which I, too, experienced.  But whereas I saw the fossils as evidence of the wonder of God’s Creation, Ms. Fulwiler saw them as depressing shadows of herself.  If she was no different from one of these long-dead animals, who would exist, have a series of chemical reactions, and then disappear, then what was the point?  Her book develops her thought process from this nadir.

One key point which I suspect may of us in the Gen X/Gen Y crowd related to during Ms. Fulwiler’s presentation was the theme of the shallowness of not only many people’s understanding of their faith – whether that faith be Christianity or atheism – but also her critique of the American education system our generation grew up in.  Our grasp of subjects is only supposed to be deep enough for the purposes of regurgitation, rather than developing the ability to think and reason, and for the achievement of test score results.  As a result, when in college she began to counter the arguments of Christians with questions like, “If God exists, why then is there suffering?” feeling rather smug and an original thinker for doing so, she was completely unaware of the fact that people of Faith have been attempting to address these questions in philosophy for over 5,000 years.

In eventually coming to believe in God, Ms. Fulwiler pointed to the realization she experienced that atheism did not have the lexicon to explain the human experience, particularly after her first child was born.  This triggered a willingness to give prayer a go, to start reading the Bible, and to engage in conversation online with atheists and theists alike, as she searched for answers to her questions.  It just so happened that those whom she engaged with online who had the answers that made the most sense to her, in countering the arguments of her fellow atheists, were the Catholics.

During the Q&A portion of the evening, I was particularly struck by one concept which Ms. Fulwiler has put into practice.  She noted that when you are trying to make God and the Sacraments the central theme of your life, you tend to live very differently from those who do not, even fellow Catholics who are not quite there yet; there may be parishes full of Catholics, but there are Catholics and there are Catholics.  To that end, particularly in the present malaise, she noted that it was very hard to constantly be swimming upstream against the culture, and the importance of periodically trying to take a break and just be around other devout Catholics who are also trying their best – not to debate theology or the like, but to form communities and enjoy each other’s company.  This is something which she herself has done on rather a large scale for Catholic women, as you can read about on the site for the Edel Gathering.

On a personal note, it was also great to finally meet Ms. Fulwiler, after having been “Tweeps” (Twitter friends) for some time.  She was just as gracious and smart in person as I expected she would be.  I’m looking forward to reading her book, and for those of you who may get the chance to hear her speak in your area, do go: you will not disappointed.  And be sure to check out her new weekly radio show, over on the Catholic Channel at Sirius XM.

Jennifer Fulwiler