This Friday: Experience High “Fidelity” In DC

​If you follow me on social media, you know that I often comment on how wonderful the music is at my parish of St. Stephen Martyr here in the Nation’s Capital. The taste and talent of the musicians, as well as the superb acoustics of the building, are a combination that few churches in Washington can match. Now, those of you who might not have the time or inclination to join us on Sunday mornings, have an opportunity to hear and see what I’m talking about for yourselves.

This Friday, February 17th at 7:30 pm at St. Stephen’s, soprano Grace Srinivasan – who is also our cantor at St. Stephen’s – and harpsichordist Paula Maust will be performing a program of Baroque music entitled “In Pursuit Of Fidelity”, featuring music by Henry Purcell, Domenico Scarlatti, and others. The church is located at 2436 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, on the corner of Pennsylvania Avenue and 25th Streets NW, just a few blocks from the Foggy Bottom Metro station. A free will offering will be collected to support the music at St. Stephen’s.

The ladies are co-founders of Musica Spira (“Music Breathes”), an ensemble which brings music of the Baroque past to new audiences in the present, in order to show its continued relevance to today. Grace has a lovely, clear voice, as you can hear, and Paula is a sensitive, thoughtful performer, such as in this performance.  As both are Peabody Conservatory alumni with extensive experience on stage, you can be assured that this is going to be a high quality performance.

What’s more, anyone who has ever visited St. Stephen’s remarks on both the elegant, cool simplicity and amazing acoustics inside the church, thanks to the swooping parabolic arches that define the interior. So for those of you who appreciate architecture as well as music, this concert experience will be worth your time as well. I hope to see many of you there, and if you spot me in the audience, do take a moment to come over and say hello!

​Savoring Spain: A Beautiful Painting Of St. Joseph And The Christ Child Comes To Market

We live in a time in which amateurish assemblages such as this are considered “worthy” of winning major art prizes, while childish nonsense is viewed as a “major” donation to an art museum. So let’s take a moment away from the madness to admire a beautifully painted, rather serene work of art by a great Old Master painter, which is coming up for sale tomorrow evening. While it’s not something that most of us have the space to hang on the wall, I would happily rearrange my entire house around it.

On Thursday Christie’s in London will be auctioning a private collection which, particularly if you love Spanish art as I do, will make your mouth water. The sale includes works by a number of both well-known and unknown Spanish artists, including Pedro Berruguete, Juan de Valdés Leal, and Francisco de Zurbarán, as well as pieces by a number of other European and American artists. Decorative objects in the collection include things like Gothic chests, Persian carpets, Etruscan statuary, and just about everything else you would need to furnish a very well-appointed residence.

For me the highlight of the sale is a magnificent, life-sized painting of “St. Joseph and the Christ Child” by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1618-1682), one of the greatest of all Spanish Old Master painters. In this picture we see St. Joseph holding the young Jesus by the hand, bringing Him forward for us to see. In the background is the base of a square column, while up above golden light pours through thick clouds, which are filled with little angels.

This painting is a perfect example of the Baroque art that was created during the Counter-Reformation, which sought to forge an emotional connection between viewer and subject matter. Murillo has provided a sharp contrast between the weight and solemnity of the two figures standing on terra firma, and the weightless movement of the heavenly figures floating up above. While over time the Baroque became more and more overwrought with gesticulation, ornament, and fussiness, until it eventually turned into the Rococo, here it is very dignified, while still carrying an emotional impact.

Take a moment to step back and notice the palette in this picture, and you’ll realize that the primary color in this piece is gray. Unlike in Gothic or Renaissance art, where colors were usually extremely bright and vivid, this piece is almost monochromatic. Murillo punctuates this by using a mustard gold for St. Joseph’s cloak, and a pale lavender for Jesus’ robe, but even these colors are somewhat toned down. His  artistic choices were entirely in keeping with the more reserved court dress and social etiquette that held sway during the Golden Age of the Spanish Empire, when this painting was created.

The auction estimate on this painting is roughly $4-6 million, which admittedly sounds like quite a lot – well okay, it is quite a lot. However, when you consider that this pointless (if admittedly attractive) dropcloth…er, painting sold for $34 million recently, then the Murillo is really quite a bargain. Plus, no one will accidentally throw it in a corner of the garage.

The Courtier in The Federalist: The Frick’s Van Dyck Exhibition Is Weird But Good

Today over at The Federalist, check out my latest for them: a review of the new Van Dyck exhibition at The Frick Collection in New York. My thanks to Ben Domenech, Joy Pullman, and everyone at The Federalist for their continued encouragement and support. I’m deeply grateful that they continue to allow me the opportunity to share some of my thoughts with their readers.

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