Thought-Pourri: Pop Song Edition

I’ll be in New York on Saturday to review the “Zurbarán’s Jacob and His Twelve Sons: Paintings from Auckland Castle” exhibition at The Frick Collection. It only occurred to me after the fact that a) I’m going to New York on St. Patrick’s Day, which does not bode well for getting about, and b) the starting route for the annual St. Patrick’s Day parade is, effectively, in front of The Frick, which also does not bode well. I plan to keep myself in a culturally appropriate good mood by downloading some pop songs by The Corrs onto my Spotify. So let’s continue with that poppy spirit in this week’s roundup of some interesting news from the art world.

I’m A Not-So-Little Teapot

For those of you who, like me, are encouraged by news of amazing finds whenever you go to a flea market or have a hunt about on Ebay, take a look at this story which has grossed one lucky collector somewhere around $800,000. It seems that this individual bought an old, cracked porcelain teapot in an online auction in England for around $20, thinking that it might be more valuable than its asking price. After consigning the piece for sale at his local auction house, it was identified by experts as a piece made by John Bartlam, a potter working in South Carolina in the mid-18th century: note the palmetto, the state tree of South Carolina, which also appears on the South Carolina state flag. The dating makes it possibly the earliest known porcelain teapot to be produced in America, and as such the piece is of tremendous historic importance, despite its somewhat shabby state of repair at present. The teapot was purchased by a London antiques dealer on behalf of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and should be heading back to these shores for the first time in over 300 years, unless the cousins refuse it an export license.

Teapot

Going To The Chapel (Not)

I encourage you to read this interesting story from Apollo Magazine, which details the history of the charming Chapel of Our Lady of Sorrows at Eton College in England, built between 1914-15 in the style of a small, Italian Baroque church. Thanks to the entrenched anti-Catholicism of the British establishment, the chapel had to be built with no windows, only skylights, and initially Catholic students at Eton were forbidden from worshiping there. The interior features many different colored marble panels, and despite the lack of windows on the sides, the light flooding in through the skylights reflects off of the surfaces and creates a jewel-like effect. This building is definitely something worth seeking out, should you find yourself thereabouts.

Eton

How Much Is That Corgi In The Painting

As regular readers know, I’m always encouraged by museum curators who try to make more of their holdings available to the public, particularly when so much art is languishing in basements and attics at public expense, but without the ability of the public to engage with it. Sometimes real treasures are found when a museum cleans out the cupboards, and such is the case with the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, which has just completed a three-year dig through its holdings. Of particular note is the charming “Portrait of Mrs. Anne Dashwood” (c. 1770) newly attributed to the great English portraitist George Romney (1734-1802), making this a find of significant value both to Romney’s catalogue raisonné and from a purely financial point of view. Corgi lovers, take note.

Romney

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