The Courtier In The Federalist: Is ‘The Last Da Vinci’ Really Worth $450 Million?

My latest piece for The Federalist lands today, in which I look at some of the factors surrounding the record-breaking sale of Leonardo’s “Salvator Mundi” at Christie’s back in November. I argue that the price is not as extraordinary as it appears, or at least as it was made out to be by the art media establishment, which tends to have – shocker – a rather bizarre attitude when it comes to valuing art. There were other factors at work in the bidding war for this painting, which everyone from The New York Times on down seems to have ignored in a rush to condemn its final sales price.

Special thanks not only to the always-patient Joy Pullmann, Executive Editor of The Federalist, whom I always confront with thousands upon thousands of words which she must judiciously trim down into something readable, but also to Dr. David Hebert of Aquinas College, for providing some helpful, explanatory context for the article on the economic aspects of this particular sale.

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