Talking Movies and Music: Cinematic Snobs

Last evening I had the pleasure of appearing on the Cinematic Snobs podcast with hosts Jay Caruso and Andrea Ruth. We had an entertaining discussion about our Top 5 films about musicians, and fortunately no one came to blows. You can download the episode by following this link.

Below follow my choices for the show, with some explanation to hopefully whet your appetite for seeing these films, or looking at them again in a new way. Being considered quite the snob (by some), I suspect that at least part of my list will come as a surprise to my readers, but here we go:

1.      Autumn Sonata (1978) – Hollywood legend Ingrid Bergman, in her final film, plays a famous musician who spends a raw and painful weekend with her estranged children. Directed by (the equally legendary) Ingmar Bergman, in his last film made specifically for the big screen, this pairing of Sweden’s greatest actress with Sweden’s greatest director took a lifetime to happen, and does not disappoint. Both Bergmans were nominated for Oscars – she for acting, he for the screenplay – and the movie won the Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language film.

2.      Tous les Matins du Monde (1991) – A slow, occasionally surreal, yet passionate interpretation of the life of the late 17th century French musician and composer Marin Marais and his teacher, M. de Sainte-Colombe, this film is based on the novel (and screenplay) of the same name by best-selling author Pascal Quignard. Played both by Gerard Depardieu and – in flashback – by his son Guillaume Depardieu, Marais wants to learn to play the viola da gamba at a high level, and Sainte-Colombe is the elusive master of the instrument. The soundtrack to this film is mesmerizing, and the performances are deeply personal; it won seven Cesar Awards (the French equivalent of the Oscars), including Best Film and Best Music.   

3.      La Vie en Rose (2007) – The film that catapulted Oscar-winning actress Marion Cotillard to international fame, based on the life of the great French singer Edith Piaf, is something of a mess in its editing, and at times the production feels more like a telenovela than a work of serious cinema. Yet these shortcomings are overcome by Cotillard, who transforms herself from young peasant girl to international star to tragic cripple in a performance which was duly recognized by practically all of the major international cinema awards. The intensity of Piaf’s music and Cotillard’s acting are a perfect match.

4.      The Sound of Music (1965) – Just about everyone loves this movie, but not everyone stops to think about the reality on which it was based. The relatively happy life, and relatively simple escape from the Nazis, of the Von Trapp Family Singers as portrayed on film, was not quite as easy as it appears. When life took away their livelihood, music became their new life. This is hinted at in the film, but the film should be your gateway to the real story of the power of music to help us come through adversity.

5.      This Is Spinal Tap (1984) – Admittedly this is what my sister would call a “guy movie” – particularly if you are about 14-16 years old, or, as is probably the case, you are still mentally about that age even if you are now a grown man. A spoof by director Rob Reiner on the pretentious rockumentaries of the 1970’s and 1980’s, the film has a deadly earnestness to it, in which the slowly disintegrating band and their increasingly awful concerts are treated so seriously, that we cannot help but laugh at them – and indeed at ourselves, for taking rock-schlock so seriously. However there is also a sweetness to this movie, in which the unexpected resolution of the plot shows that sticking with what you love, even if your life doesn’t quite turn out the way you expected, is the right decision.

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