They Blew It: The Met Loses A Rubens

Those of us who follow the art world, even if only to a limited extent, are often dismayed to find ourselves confronted by glowing evaluations of poorly executed work. Part of the problem in this regard is the disastrously bad level of art education which most American children have been receiving in school over the past 40 years, thanks to an art establishment which seems incapable of agreeing on teaching anything of value. The problem is, the same slipshod attitude toward art history and appreciation may be having a negative influence on our artistic institutions as well.

Some weeks ago I wrote a piece discussing the fact that the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York appears to have no end of rich suitors plying her with gifts. Of course, The Met seeks to prove herself to be just as attractive to tech and media barons today, as she was to industrial titans a century ago. Yet in seeking to stay current, one wonders if she may be falling into the trap described above, spending too much time on keeping up with the youngsters, and too little on actually caring for her treasures.

For many years, The Met owned a painting supposedly by the great Peter Paul Rubens, the Dutch master of Baroque painting. The portrait of a young girl, believed to be one of Rubens’ daughters, was not hugely appreciated in its time at the museum; when an art expert decided it was not by Rubens, the Met decided to sell it, so as to gain more money and space for other objects. This is a practice known as deaccessioning, and it happens in museums more often than you might think.

When the painting went up for sale, the initial sales estimate proved to be a bit too low, because others were convinced the portrait WAS a genuine Rubens. Since being sold the piece has been restored to the listing of works by the great Old Master painter; indeed, it is now on display in the artist’s former home in Antwerp. The painting provides a fascinating, informal insight into the family life of a man who was himself larger than life, one of the most professionally successful artists who has ever lived.

This has been called “the biggest deaccessioning blunder of recent times,” and it’s not hard to see why. The fact that the museum relied on a single expert is weird enough. Also it’s not only ironic that, as the expert in the piece linked to above points out, with so much more and better technology available that a slip-up like this could occur, the fact that it did so at this level of artistic institution may also a factor indicative of decline.

The ability to tell what is good and what is bad has not only faded away from the moral lexicon used by society, it has increasingly faded away from the world of high art, as well. That is an unpopular view, of course. Nevertheless the point does need to be made, that if the powers that be at The Met were more concerned with studying and appreciating the works they already own, rather than pining for things which they do not, this likely would not have happened. Perhaps some remedial art appreciation is what’s needed up on Fifth Avenue to stop this sort of disaster from happening again.

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Portrait of A Young Girl (poss. Clara Serena Rubens)

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4 thoughts on “They Blew It: The Met Loses A Rubens

  1. Nothing is as frustrating as an inept person in a position of authority. The expression goes, “You can’t fix stupid.”

    There is some sense of correctness in having the Dutch artwork return to its homeland.

    I love visiting museums. However, I am angry when museums do not return artwork which is recognized as having been confiscated by the Nazis.

    Unfortunately, the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art seems to fall into that category.

    http://nypost.com/2012/10/07/new-york-museums-have-not-returned-nazi-seized-art/

    http://content.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,2032408,00.html

    Like

  2. What an exquisite picture! Such a loving treatment of the subject. It looks like it could be his daughter. There’s also just a bit of mischief behind her eyes, which makes it even more charming. 🙂

    Its really a shame that the Met lost this picture. I shudder to think what they will put in it’s place. Hopefully this gem will find a better home where it will be displayed more prominently.

    Like

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