Dominicans to the Rescue: Saving Souls and Civilization in Iraq

Obviously there is much to be said, and much that is praiseworthy, when someone heroically saves another’s life.  People are more important than property, something which all of us need reminding of from time to time.  Yet sometimes we can find equally praiseworthy acts of heroism when it comes to rescuing objects that are part of the heritage of all mankind.  So for this blog post, I want to take the opportunity to laud the work of my favorite religious order, the Dominicans, who are doing something heroic not only for the care and salvation of souls, but also for preserving civilization, right now, in a very dangerous place and time.

As ISIS slashes and burns its way across Iraq, we are right to focus on their human victims, first and foremost.  Yet ISIS is not only interested in terrorizing their fellow human beings through violence and intimidation.  Rather, they want to show the people of the lands they are conquering, to paraphrase a line from the film “Doctor Zhivago” after the Bolsheviks have killed the Tsar and all of his family, that now, there’s no going back to the way things were. And part of the way ISIS is going about this task is through the destruction of culture and history.

To counter that effort, the Order of Preachers, more popularly known as the Dominicans, have been trying to rescue as many ancient Christian texts as they can ahead of the ISIS onslaught. In an interview with France24, Fr. Laurent Lemoine, O.P., described how he has been assisting in Iraq with the preservation of centuries-old manuscripts, currently in the care of Fr. Najeeb Michaeel, O.P., who with the help of his fellow Dominicans threw everything they could into a truck and fled ISIS for the comparative safety of the Kurdish city of Erbil, with only half an hour’s warning.

Fr. Michaeel’s is a name which may be familiar to some of my readers from publications like First Things, where he has been reporting on the experiences of the Dominicans and those to whom they minister. This interview in particular gives some indication of what he and the other friars face, and also why they choose to stay.  Their dedication and courage in this regard is an example to all of us who can glibly declare, amidst our relative ease and comforts, that we’re prepared to lay down our lives for our brother, as Christ tells us we must be willing to do.  These friars are putting themselves at risk every day, and not only for their fellow Catholics, but for all of those who are fleeing the ISIS terror.

For those who understand the importance of history and preserving the heritage of civilization, the work that Fr. Michaeel and the Dominicans are doing is no less important.  Without it, the real danger would be the loss of identity and roots for a group of people who have already lost almost everything else they once had.  At the same time, the existence of these objects connects them and indeed us to centuries of our forebears in Christianity, in the part of the world where Christianity first arose.

Christians do not need old objects, like ancestral bones or ancient parchments, to be able to worship God. Yet the Church has always recognized that preserving the past is a way to be more fully aware of the role God has played throughout human history, and the need to respect and honor the traditions and knowledge which others have contributed to the Church as well as to mankind as a whole.  Let us hope that one day, these books and the descendents of those who created them will once again be able to find a place of peace and restoration.

Fr. Najeeb Michaeel, O.P., with some of the rescued manuscripts

Fr. Najeeb Michaeel, O.P., with some of the rescued manuscripts

 

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One thought on “Dominicans to the Rescue: Saving Souls and Civilization in Iraq

  1. “Christians do not need old objects, like ancestral bones or ancient parchments, to be able to worship God. Yet the Church has always recognized that preserving the past is a way to be more fully aware of the role God has played throughout human history, and the need to respect and honor the traditions and knowledge which others have contributed to the Church as well as to mankind as a whole.”

    Oh, the word “need.” I don’t particularly need a shotgun to protect myself from a home invasion, but it certainly improves my chances of survival and protection from injury over hand to hand combat. In a world where atheists, seculars, other denominations, and now Muslims insist on various misunderstandings as reality; that Jesus was never recognized ad the second Person of the Trinity in the early Church, the Catholic Church was a creation of Constantine in 325 A.D. and wasn’t anything like it is for the first 300 years, there was no historical Jesus but a composite of other characters into a philosopher-prophet, there was always a Muslim middle East (!) and places like Egypt, North Africa, Iraq are naturally Muslim, you need the bedrock of solid historical and archaeological artifacts and touchable, seeable items in your toolbox of defense. Jews have had to often bring up historical artifacts to remind people there really was a systematic holocaust of them by the Nazis when holocaust deniers were active back when camp survivors with forearm i.d. tattoos were still plentiful. In turn we need real items, true, not to convince us to believe, though it helps, but to deal with the doubting outside world and its need for proof that can be held.

    There was a real, historical St. Peter; his bones are buried in Rome where he was killed. There was a real, historical St. Mark who brought the faith to Egypt, and his head is in a church in Alexandria, with the rest between Cairo and Venice, who recorded Peter’s preaching into the Book of Mark. The real Peter walked with the real Jesus, whose burial shroud is in Turin and whose sudarium is in Orvietto, the Jesus who Peter declared “You are the Christ, the son of the living God.” Here are the actual papyrus or vellum pages written by this or that church father showing that what we do now can be traced all the way back. Here is the stack of letters by Ignatius of Antioch where he writes of his belief in the concrete reality of the incarnation, cross, and the Eucharist as the Real Presence. (http://catholicexchange.com/martyr-glowing-divine-love) Here are the records of there being a Pontius Pilate. And here are a stack of historical relics showing that Christianity was truly a religion adopted by the people like wildfire until it supplanted the other religions, eastward in the Levant outside of Roman lands and Roman control so no, it wasn’t a Roman government thing.

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